Queen Street Auckland, then and now.

These two pictures give some real meaning to the old adage “a picture is worth a thousand words”. Ain’t it funny how Progressives value every race’s right to preserve its culture and heritage except for Europeans of British descent.

Queen St 1950

Queen St 1950

Queen St today

Queen St today



Categories: Culture, NZ Politics

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20 replies

  1. “Bring ’em in and they’ll vote for us!”

    That explains a lot.

    Bill.

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  2. Some of them Asian chicks are pretty hot

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    • Look at our country and others. People practice self-segregation all the time, consciously or unconsciously. (By the same process, a large majority of those who marry do so within their own kind.) It might shock some people, but, for the very reason people haven’t noticed it before doesn’t mean it should become a problem just for it being pointed out to them…

      I’m more concerned about forced integration – the inverse of voluntary segregation. Whether via mass immigration or other means, it’s a destructive, dyscivic force. The joys of it are continuing to flourish in California, Dearborn, MI; Rotherham, Bradford, Malmo, and many more.

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    • AsiaNZ Foundation featured a cartoon from the Herald. Two rough Kiwi men commented that the women could come but the men could stay behind. The underlining message was that that was unfair. But really do the citizens of a national have to give up their rights to exclusive possession of *their* territory without compensation? We are told ad infinitum that these people are cone-heads [the movie] bringing skills. Spoonley gritted his teeth on TVNZ and exclaimed (re Indians and Chinese immigration) “we *need* their skills. The whole sham would end in a day if the property construction sector wasn’t milking it?

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  3. In the bottom photo the white guy and his wife look like tourists as well.

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  4. And they never asked us.

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  5. Another difference –
    Then: people making up their own mind when to cross the side street,
    Now: waiting to be told when they will be allowed to.

    [Aside: When I was playing the tourist in Auckland a few years ago I wanted to get to the other side of Queen Street. There was a gap in the traffic both ways, so I just crossed where I was between two of the official crossing points. Noted by a cop who shouted at me through the Tannoy on his car. Ignored him and carried on!]

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  6. Looks exactly like my city in Australia. I suppose Queen St., is full of convenience stores run by foreigners, money exchange joints run by foreigners and budget eateries run foreigners too? I fantasise about a giant human vacuum cleaner returning everyone to their proper abode.

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  7. Hot day in Auckland

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  8. China today is extraordinarily homogenous. It sustains that by remaining almost entirely closed to new entrants except by birth. Unless someone is the child of a Chinese national, no matter how long they live there, how much money they make or tax they pay, it is virtually impossible to become a citizen. Someone who marries a Chinese person can theoretically gain citizenship; in practice few do. As a result, the most populous nation on Earth has only 1,448 naturalised Chinese in total, according to the 2010 census. Even Japan, better known for hostility to immigration, naturalises around 10,000 new citizens each year; in America the figure is some 700,000 (see chart).
    http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21710264-worlds-rising-superpower-has-particular-vision-ethnicity-and-nationhood-has

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  9. Christchurch: A City and Its People Hardcover – December, 1973
    https://www.amazon.com/Christchurch-City-People-Philip-Temple/dp/072330372X
    Only New Zealanders and Maori in that book. I wonder what others came out about that time?

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  10. Would be interesting to put together a time series?

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